Where Do The New Batch of CUHK Fine Arts BA Graduates Go From Here?

Ten Chocolate Dots(Left), by artist Cheng Meilun Twinkle Twinkle Little Star (Right), by artist Cheng Meilun
Exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space
exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space
To Remember, by artist Ng Yu Sai
exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
Insularity, by artist Kwok Wan Hei
Insularity (Detail), by artist Kwok Wan Hei
The SimGarden, by artist Chan Kwan Lok
Paradise, by artist Kan Hiu Kwan
Hide and Seek, by artist Au-Yeung Ho Chit
exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space
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Video Art Asia by COBOSocial.com

It is merely a start.

Wi1 Wang4 Wang4, the CUHK Fine Arts BA Graduate Exhibition is now on display at chi K11 art space. chi K11 art space offers art students a platform to interact with the audiences strolling around East Tsim Sha Tsui. No matter it is only a short encounter with the public or an in-depth viewing by an art enthusiast, students get the chance to rethink the meanings encompassed in their art works and where they position themselves in the divergent art world. Through communicating and exchanging ideas with the public, the voices of our promising art graduates are reaching out and resonating in the community.

Text: Qiuyi Wang

Photos: K11 Art Project Team

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Exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space
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exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space

You might be curious about what the title “Wi1 Wang4 Wang4” means. When you say these words out loud, it is not hard to realise that they are the sounds of martial artists sparring and fighting.  Without a doubt, after all these years of study and hard work, they are quite ready to show up and present. In this exhibition, more than 20 graduates’ artworks are exhibited. They express concern for social issues, life situation, and their reflection on humanity in their works. From Chinese painting, oil painting, sculpture to mixed media, they transferred their life experience such as relationships, childhood memories into art pieces, delivering their thoughts and responses to various issues in the world.

To Remember, by artist Ng Yu Sai
To Remember, by artist Ng Yu Sai
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exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space

One of the most provocative works is People will say I am a monster with what I have done by MOK Ting Yan. Inspired by Japanese novel “Goth”, she used chewing gums to shape fingers. When you first see those either pink or carnation fingers, they are quite scary. However, behind the cruelness, you might be able to find the hidden beauty. Using chewing gum as her major material, she wants to experiment with the relationship of destruction and recreation.

People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan
People will say I am a monster with what I have done (detail), by artist MOK Ting Yan

Other must-see works are two video installations: Ten Chocolate Dots and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star made by CHENG Meilun. The former is a special presentation of the artist herself. In it she puts ten chocolate dots around her mouth and slowly licks them up. However, you can see two dots are her signature marks. When all the chocolate dots are licked off, just like peeling off the skin of an onion, layers upon layers, you can finally see what is underneath. In this way, she explores the topic of “A Real Self” and “The Meaning of Life”.

Insularity, by artist Kwok Wan Hei
Insularity, by artist Kwok Wan Hei
Insularity (Detail), by artist Kwok Wan Hei
Insularity (Detail), by artist Kwok Wan Hei
The SimGarden, by artist Chan Kwan Lok
The SimGarden, by artist Chan Kwan Lok

Many art graduates have chosen traditional Chinese art as a way to convey their emotions or thinking.  The SimGarden is an epic one created by CHAN Kwan Lok, which is worthy of longer contemplation. It is made up of 5 Gongbi paintings (traditional Chinese realistic painting). Using this detailed, traditional Chinese painting method, CHAN Kwan Lok depicted a utopian paradise intertwining natural and artificial elements. Human beings coexist with animals through his vibrant display, just like a fairy-tale but at the same time there are elements of absurdity to it too. CHAN Kwan Lok made a perfect balance between aesthetics and inspirational connotation.  NGAN Yu Ting, KAN Hiu Kwan and AU-YEUNG Ho Chit are among those who also have chosen Gongbi as the technique of creation.  They revitalize this traditional Chinese art with their personal stories and modern elements.

Paradise, by artist Kan Hiu Kwan
Paradise, by artist Kan Hiu Kwan
Hide and Seek, by artist Au-Yeung Ho Chit
Hide and Seek, by artist Au-Yeung Ho Chit
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exhibition overview @ chi K11 art space


Wi1 Wang4 Wang4
is not a conclusion of these fine arts students’ three-year study, it is a brand new start for their future journey into the world of arts.  You might wonder how these art graduates’ future will be. One CUHK art student told us, “Not everyone can be lucky enough to earn fame even with jobs in the arts. Not all of them can continue in doing arts after school to make ends meet.” As the student said, some of them might start teaching arts while others might begin to establish relationships with galleries no matter it is for commercial reasons or not. Those who are doing traditional Chinese art or oil painting are more likely to sell their works in commercial galleries; those who are doing multi-media arts are less likely to sell their works. Nevertheless, as long as they have passion, they can continuously stay in the arts field and wait for opportunities to turn up.

This exhibition attempts to convey a message from art graduates collectively that “Our strength now may be limited, and not yet refined, but we will continue to practice till we reach every corner of the world. And thus, ‘Wi1 Wang4 Wang4’ may continue to echo on.”

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Qiuyi: currently a master student in Arts and Cultural Management at King’s College London; Arts and travel fanatic, illustrator, blogger (Presenting arts information for Chinese readers in WeChat Public Platform, a/c: wildmushroomart).

 
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