10 Booths That Are Worth Your Visit At Art Basel Hong Kong 2022

Jason Boyd Kinsella, Sarah, 2021, oil on linen, 120 x 200 cm. Photo by Tanguy Beurdeley. Image courtesy of the artist and Perrotin.
(Left) Jean-Marie Appriou, Freyfaxi, 2022, aluminium, 146 x 120 x 40 cm. Photo by Claire Dorn. Image courtesy of the artist and Perrotin; (Right) Koak, Dark Corridor, 2021-2022, acrylic, graphite, Flashe, and chalk on linen, 201.9 x 149.9 cm. Photo by Chris Grunder. Image courtesy of the artist, Perrotin, and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.
(Left) Alec Egan, Fruit Bowl with Bird, 2021, oil and flashe on canvas, 182.9 x 152.4 cm; (Right) Alec Egan, Tulip on windowsill, 2022, oil and flashe on canvas, 182.9 x 152.4 cm. Images courtesy of the artist and Anat Ebgi.
(Left) Tom Friedman, Looking Up, 2020, stainless steel, 304.8 cm, edition of 2; (Right) Lari Pittman, Luminous: Cities with Egg Monuments 4, 2022, acrylic and spray enamel on gessoed archival museum board mounted on panel, 101.6 x 81.3 cm / 104.5 x 83.8 x 4.5 cm (framed). Images courtesy of the artists and Lehmann Maupin.
Tsang Tsou Choi, Graffiti Calligraphy, 2004 – 2006, marker on Hong Kong Map, 28 x 43 cm. Image courtesy of Lucie Chang Fine Arts.
(Left) Gordon Cheung, Window #03, 2018, Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive, 80 x 57 cm; (Right) Jana Benitez, Big Energy, 2022, oil and acrylic on canvas, 121.9 x 91.4 cm. Images courtesy of the artists and Pearl Lam Galleries.
Aida Tomescu, Folded in Three, 2022, oil on belgian linen, 190 x 460 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Flowers Gallery.
(Left) Tsherin Sherpa, Luxation 2, 2016, acrylic and ink on canvas, 16 panels, 50.8 x 50.8 cm each; (Right) Tsherin Sherpa, Skippers (Kneedeep), 2022, acrylic and ink on fiber glass, 91.4 cm (height), edition 2 of 7. Images courtesy of the artist and Rossi & Rossi.
Chou Yu-Cheng, Moody #19, 2021, acrylic on paper, paper mounted on canvas, 150 x 120 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Kiang Malingue.
Cai Zebin, A Revisit at 2 bis rue Perrel (Manuscript 1) , 2021, acrylic on canvas, 62 x 87 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Capsule Shanghai.
Tap Chan, Duplicity, 2022, thermal plastic, Jesmonite, fake plant, real plant, 44 x 146 x 40 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Mine Project.
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CoBo Social Design and Architecture

After all the pandemic-related shifts and turns, one thing about Art Basel Hong Kong remains unchanged: the dread of not knowing what to visit at all is far worse than being unable to make it through the ocean of people in the halls of the Hong Kong Exhibition and Convention Centre. Don’t worry, we took care of the hard part and shortlisted for you the 10 booths we think that are worth visiting this year.

TEXT: CoBo Editorial
IMAGES: Courtesy of various

 

Jason Boyd Kinsella, Sarah, 2021, oil on linen, 120 x 200 cm. Photo by Tanguy Beurdeley. Image courtesy of the artist and Perrotin.
(Left) Jean-Marie Appriou, Freyfaxi, 2022, aluminium, 146 x 120 x 40 cm. Photo by Claire Dorn. Image courtesy of the artist and Perrotin; (Right) Koak, Dark Corridor, 2021-2022, acrylic, graphite, Flashe, and chalk on linen, 201.9 x 149.9 cm. Photo by Chris Grunder. Image courtesy of the artist, Perrotin, and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

 

Perrotin
Booth 1D21

Perrotin’s presentation will bring together works across a range of mediums from a diverse selection of the mega-gallery’s strong roster from Takashi Murakami and Jean-Michel Othoniel to Hans Hartung and Park Seo-Bo, and more. The spotlight will be on the Hong Kong debut for a line-up of artists who recently began representation with or collaborating Perrotin, including Tavares Strachan, Jason Boyd Kinsella, Jean-Marie Appriou, and Koak.

Alongside Appriou’s imaginative aluminium and bronze equine and chiropteran sculptures transport viewers to his fantastical world will be Kinsella’s paintings in which the subjects are a reflection of the Myers-Briggs personality test, and Koak’s paintings through which comic-inspired line work and an intense palette depict emotionally charged figures imbued with a sense of self-agency.

Perrotin is also presenting “The Driver”, Koak’s debut solo exhibition with the gallery and in Asia, which is currently on view at Perrotin Hong Kong.

 

(Left) Alec Egan, Fruit Bowl with Bird, 2021, oil and flashe on canvas, 182.9 x 152.4 cm; (Right) Alec Egan, Tulip on windowsill, 2022, oil and flashe on canvas, 182.9 x 152.4 cm. Images courtesy of the artist and Anat Ebgi.

 

Anat Ebgi
Booth 1C38

Anat Ebgi returns to Art Basel Hong Kong with a solo presentation of Los Angeles-based painter Alec Egan. “Out Look” serves as an extension of the artist’s coinciding show at the Los Angeles gallery, and will feature a series of new paintings that are marked by the artist’s vivid imagination and art-historical references ranging from Hokusai to Van Gogh.

His works revolve around still life painting and interior scenes paired with atmospheric landscapes. In Fruit Bowl with Bird (2021) and Tulip on windowsill (2022), both paintings are embellished with floral-patterned interiors, filled with symbolic motifs, such as shoes and furniture, which evoke the viewer’s imagination of the absent tenants.

 

(Left) Tom Friedman, Looking Up, 2020, stainless steel, 304.8 cm, edition of 2; (Right) Lari Pittman, Luminous: Cities with Egg Monuments 4, 2022, acrylic and spray enamel on gessoed archival museum board mounted on panel, 101.6 x 81.3 cm / 104.5 x 83.8 x 4.5 cm (framed). Images courtesy of the artists and Lehmann Maupin.

 

Lehmann Maupin
Booth 1C17

Never one to disappoint, Lehmann Maupin returns to Art Basel Hong Kong this year with a suite of works that illustrate the curatorial focus for the gallery programme at its newly expanded gallery space in Seoul, where it was one of the first international galleries to establish a permanent space in the South Korean capital. Alongside new paintings by American artists McArthur Binion and Lari Pittman, the sculptural works of conceptual artist Tom Friedman, whose inaugural solo exhibition in Seoul is currently on view, will be spotlighted for the first time in Hong Kong, including his much-celebrated Looking Up (2020), a figure looking to the sky, inviting viewers to stand at its base and do the same.

 

Tsang Tsou Choi, Graffiti Calligraphy, 2004 – 2006, marker on Hong Kong Map, 28 x 43 cm. Image courtesy of Lucie Chang Fine Arts.

 

Lucie Chang Fine Arts
Booth 1D52

Homegrown gallery Lucie Chang Fine Arts makes its Art Basel Hong Kong debut this year with a solo presentation of Tsang Tsou Choi (aka. King of Kowloon). After discovering some important ancestral documents that led him to believe his family were owners of the land of Kowloon, Tsang started to cover the streets of Hong Kong with his unique style of calligraphy using brush and ink, sometimes with a marker.

After decades of persistent writings, Tsang’s works have become a prominent part of Hong Kong’s shared cultural memory. Honing a unique perspective of viewing the works as street or graffiti art, rather than calligraphy, the gallery will tell the tale of Tsang’s expressive spirit through more than 10 works, notably a series of Graffiti Calligraphy (2004–2006), where, through writing with a marker pen, and an old Kowloon map as the canvas, he declared his status as the King of Kowloon.

 

(Left) Gordon Cheung, Window #03, 2018, Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive, 80 x 57 cm; (Right) Jana Benitez, Big Energy, 2022, oil and acrylic on canvas, 121.9 x 91.4 cm. Images courtesy of the artists and Pearl Lam Galleries.

 

Pearl Lam Galleries
Booth 1D16

From questioning the status quo to probing existential questions, Pearl Lam Galleries’ presentation covers some of the crucial questions we face living in the modern world. On view will be Jana Benitez’s latest work Big Energy(2022). Drawing inspirations from Buddhism, Daoism, and Tantra, the painting expresses human vitality through a bold, vibrant composition, depicting the nuanced activation and movement of qi in the human body. London-based artist Gordon Cheung expresses his critique towards global capitalism and its effect on our sense of identity and belongingness through the Windows series using the Financial Times newspaper as base material.

 

Aida Tomescu, Folded in Three, 2022, oil on belgian linen, 190 x 460 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Flowers Gallery.

 

Flowers Gallery
Booth 1D48

 Returning this year to the Insights sector with a special solo presentation, Flowers Gallery will feature Australian abstract painter Aida Tomescu. The main highlight will be her latest work, Folded in Three (2022), a vibrant, high-energy triptych that speaks to the artist’s painterly abstractions and organic structures. With a focus on emphasising the interplay and contrasts amongst the works from different time periods, the presentation will also include three pivotal paintings spanning over a decade, namely Spüren (2008), Sabine (2011), and Into the open wounds of white clouds III (2019).

 

(Left) Tsherin Sherpa, Luxation 2, 2016, acrylic and ink on canvas, 16 panels, 50.8 x 50.8 cm each; (Right) Tsherin Sherpa, Skippers (Kneedeep), 2022, acrylic and ink on fiber glass, 91.4 cm (height), edition 2 of 7. Images courtesy of the artist and Rossi & Rossi.

 

Rossi & Rossi
Booth 1C03

Rossi & Rossi is certainly one to watch at this year’s Art Basel Hong Kong. The gallery will be mounting a solo showcase of Nepalese artist Tsherin Sherpa, who is also currently representing the first-ever Nepalese Pavilion at the 59th Venice Biennale. Having trained in thangka painting taught by his father Master Urgen Dorje, Sherpa’s practice fuses Buddhist iconography with contemporary or pop culture references, as depicted in Skippers (Kneedeep) (2022) and Luxation (2016), offering an interplay between the sacred and secular, traditional and modern, while exploring the connotations and identities that are of relevance to a broader Himalayan region.

 

Chou Yu-Cheng, Moody #19, 2021, acrylic on paper, paper mounted on canvas, 150 x 120 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Kiang Malingue.

 

Kiang Malingue
Booth 1C07

While Ellen Pau’s The Shape of Light (2022), a site-specific co-commission by M+ and Art Basel, is illuminating the Victoria Harbour skyline every night until mid-June, the artist’s earlier video work Drained (1989) will be featured among some 30 artworks in Kiang Malingue’s group presentation at Art Basel Hong Kong. Another highlight is Taiwanese conceptual artist Chou Yu-Cheng’s most recent paintings from the Moody series, such as Moody #19 (2021), where the artist utilises a unique painting method he devised during the peak of the pandemic period in 2020. Outside the Galleries sector, two movie works, Sorry for the late reply (2021) and Sonata for Smoke (2020, revised 2021) by Wong Ping and Samson Young respectively, will be presented in the Film sector.

 

Cai Zebin, A Revisit at 2 bis rue Perrel (Manuscript 1) , 2021, acrylic on canvas, 62 x 87 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Capsule Shanghai.

 

Capsule Shanghai
Booth 1C32

Featuring artists Cai Zebin, Gao Yuan, Liao Wen, and Douglas Rieger, Capsule Shanghai’s collaborative project “In Between” will put forth an exploration of the existence, or absence, of bodies, through outlining the human gestures that form our ever-shifting identities in both  inner and external worlds. In Cai’s A Revisit at 2 bis rue Perrel (Manuscript 1) (2021), the artist adopts elements of Surrealism in his own work, and references protagonists from famous paintings such as the flute-playing snake charmer from Henri Rousseau’s 1907 painting and Victor Brauner’s The Meeting at 2 bis, rue Perrel (1946).

 

Tap Chan, Duplicity, 2022, thermal plastic, Jesmonite, fake plant, real plant, 44 x 146 x 40 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Mine Project.

 

Mine Project
Booth 1C27

The quest of identity and truth ensues in Mine Project’s presentation with Hong Kong artist Tap Chan. As vehicles into the artist’s exploration of authenticity in the post-reality age, the installations on view will introduce a sense of obscurity between the subconscious mind and reality, from the clothing rack-like Sanitise Insanity (2022) to the botanical trees, both real and fake, placed adjacent to each other in Duplicity (2022). Meanwhile, the question of sustainability in art-making is conveyed through the materials used in the installations, in which the artist utilised non-toxic, environmentally friendly thermal plastic, a common material employed in 3D printing.

 

Art Basel Hong Kong 2022
27 – 29 May 2022
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Hong Kong

 

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