Wrapping Up The Art World: Oslo’s Cultural Mecca Opens This Week, National Treasures Loaned To Hong Kong Palace Museum, And More

National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo. Image courtesy of National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design.
“Bitchcoins” by Sarah Meyohas. Image courtesy of the artist.
GODA’s Mint Pass. Image courtesy of GODA.
(Left) Zao Wou-ki, 29.09.64., 1964, oil on canvas, 230 x 345 cm; (Right) Pablo Picasso, Buste d’homme dans un cadre, 1969, oil on canvas, 92 x 73 cm. Images courtesy of Christie’s.
(Left) Giuseppe Castiglione, The Qianlong Emperor in Armour on Horseback, 1758, hanging scroll, ink and colour on silk; (Right) Li Song, Basket of Flowers, album leaf, ink and colour on silk. © The Palace Museum. Images © and courtesy of the Palace Museum.
Azin Zolfaghari, Density, 2021, mixed media on canvas, 100 x 130cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Sovereign Art Foundation.
Rendering of the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo. Image courtesy of National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design.
Serpentine Pavilion 2022, designed by Theaster Gates. © Theaster Gates Studio. Photo by Iwan Baan. Image courtesy of Serpentine.
Serpentine Pavilion 2022, designed by Theaster Gates. © Theaster Gates Studio. Photo by Iwan Baan. Image courtesy of Serpentine.
TOP
1181
48
0
 
10
Jun
10
Jun
CoBo Social Design and Architecture

In case you missed the news, here’s a roundup of headlines from the art world in the last two weeks. 

TEXT: CoBo News
IMAGES: Courtesy of various

 

For Those Who Get To Travel Abroad

One of Europe’s leading biennials, the Berlin Biennale has unveiled its 2022 lineup two weeks prior to the opening on 11 June. In this 12th iteration, titled “Still Present!”, curated by Kader Attia, artists will engage with the “legacies of modernity and the resulting state of planetary emergency” and explore issues related to feminism, decolonisation, and restitution.

On 8 June, Bangkok Art Biennale revealed the second list of lineup for its 2022 iteration, featuring both emerging and established artists from around the world, including Antony Gormley, Sophia Al-Maria, Aor Nopawan Sirivejkul, Vadim Zakharov, and more. The biennale, featuring 43 participants in total, will take place from 22 October to 23 February 2023 across various venues in the city, such as Queen Sirikit National Convention Center and renowned temples Wat Pho, Wat Arun, and Wat Prayoon.

The 18th Venice Architecture Biennale will take place from 20 May through 26 November next year under the title of “The Laboratory of the Future”, as revealed on 31 May. Taking the African continent as the protagonist of the future, the 2023 iteration will invite architects and practitioners across various creative disciplines to “draw out examples from their contemporary practices that chart a path for the audience…to weave through, imagining for themselves what the future can hold”, explains Lesley Lokko, curator of the biennale.

Looking farther into the future, Biennale of Sydney named Berlin-based curators Cosmin Costinaș and Inti Guerrero as Artistic Directors for its 24th edition. The appointment signifies only the second time in its 49-year history that the biennale is jointly curated. The biennale is slated take place from 9 March through 10 June 2024.

Announced by The Art Assembly on 9 June,  a new international art fair Tokyo Gendai will take place at Pacifico Yokohama, Tokyo, in July 2023. Featuring 80 to 100 galleries from  Japan, Asia, and beyond, the new fair will serve as “an exciting platform for commercial, artistic and intellectual exchange, and a nexus of cross-cultural discovery”.

 

“Bitchcoins” by Sarah Meyohas. Image courtesy of the artist.
GODA’s Mint Pass. Image courtesy of GODA.

 

On The NFT Front

On 1 June, a former product manager at OpenSea, Nathaniel Chastain, was arrested and charged with wire fraud and money laundering related to insider trading of NFTs, becoming the first such case involving digital assets. According to the Department of Justice, Chastain, who was responsible for determining which NFT collections are to be featured on the platform’s homepage, allegedly used the information to “flip” dozens of NFTs—selling them at profits two to five times the initial purchase price.

That same day, Marianne Boesky Gallery announced its representation of conceptual artist Sarah Meyohas. Considered a pioneer in the realm of crypto art, Meyohas created in 2015 the first tokenisation of artworks on the blockchain with “Bitchcoin”, a cryptocurrency backed by her physical artworks. For the upcoming Art Basel in Switzerland, the 31-year-old artist will showcase her new work from the Interference series as part of the gallery’s presentation.

NFT platform GODA, conceived by a star-studded lineup of artists including KAWS, Nina Chanel Abney, Pharrell Williams, and more, officially launched on 9 June. The platform is a “premiere resource that allows exploration, education, and empowerment for artists and buyers in this new digital era” through helping traditional artists leverage their talents in the virtual realm, as well as curating a collection of artworks by both renowned and emerging talents. It offers exclusive access to its artists and NFT drops through the GODA Mint Pass—1,000 in total, with a list price of 1 ETH each, where, as of today, its secondary trading price asks for a minimum of 7.6 ETH (roughly US$13,676) on OpenSea.

 

(Left) Zao Wou-ki, 29.09.64., 1964, oil on canvas, 230 x 345 cm; (Right) Pablo Picasso, Buste d’homme dans un cadre, 1969, oil on canvas, 92 x 73 cm. Images courtesy of Christie’s.
(Left) Giuseppe Castiglione, The Qianlong Emperor in Armour on Horseback, 1758, hanging scroll, ink and colour on silk; (Right) Li Song, Basket of Flowers, album leaf, ink and colour on silk. © The Palace Museum. Images © and courtesy of the Palace Museum.

 

Pricey And Priceless Gems In Hong Kong

Christie’s Hong Kong 20th/21st Century Art sale series reaped a combined total of HK$1.81 billion (roughly US$230 million), with a sell-through rate of 97% by lot, on 26 and 27 May. The strong sales results were led by Zao Wou-Ki’s 29.09.64—hammered at a whopping HK$278 million (US$35.6 million), it clinched the second highest auction price ever achieved for the legendary Chinese-French painter. Another masterpiece from an iconic artist, Picasso’s Buste d’homme dans un cadre, sold for a staggering HK$175 million (US$22.4 million), becoming the most expensive Picasso work ever sold at Christie’s Asia.

The prestigious Hong Kong Palace Museum will open its door on 2 July. Its opening exhibitions will showcase an unprecedented loan of 914 pieces from Beijing’s Palace Museum, of which 166 works are classified as national treasures. The exhibition “Grand Gallop: Art and Culture of the Horse” will spotlight 13 loaned works from the Louvre alongside 111 equine artworks from the Palace Museum. Earlier this month, the museum held a naming ceremony for The Hong Kong Jockey Club Auditorium, in recognition of the club’s donation of HK$3.5 billion made towards the establishment of the museum.

 

Azin Zolfaghari, Density, 2021, mixed media on canvas, 100 x 130cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Sovereign Art Foundation.

 

Getting Ahead In Life

The Studio Museum in Harlem announced on 26 May the appointment of Amber Esseiva as Curator-at-Large. Currently the Curator for the Institute of Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, Essevia will commence the newly created position with emphasis on the museum’s exhibitions and acquisitions, artist relationships, and mission-related artist advocacy work.

Meanwhile, the Sovereign Art Foundation announced Azin Zolfaghari as the winner of the 2022 Sovereign Asian Art Prize. The Iranian artist topped the shortlist of 30 artists with Density (2021), a hyperrealistic painting of a building’s concrete façade, through which she explores the fluid yet complicated definition of a house.

 

Rendering of the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo. Image courtesy of National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design.
Serpentine Pavilion 2022, designed by Theaster Gates. © Theaster Gates Studio. Photo by Iwan Baan. Image courtesy of Serpentine.
Serpentine Pavilion 2022, designed by Theaster Gates. © Theaster Gates Studio. Photo by Iwan Baan. Image courtesy of Serpentine.

 

Newcomers In Town

Norway’s largest museum, the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo, will open its door this Saturday. Designed by Napoli-based architecture firm kleihues + schuwerk, the 587,000-square-foot building houses a diverse collection of 47,000 pieces, ranging from sculptures and paintings, notably Edvard Munch’s The Scream (1893), to garments and furniture, where some 5,000 of them will be on display in roughly 90 rooms.

Announced on 1 June, Frieze Los Angeles will relocate to the Santa Monica Airport for its 2023 edition. Slated to run from 16 through 19 February next year, the city’s leading art fair will take place in multiple sites across the 227-acre airport, featuring a massive tent designed by Kulapat Yantrasast’s architecture firm WHY along with Mark Thomann, the firm’s landscape director.

The 21st Serpentine PavilionBlack Chapel, designed by Chicago-based artist Theaster Gates—opens today. Realised with support from architecture firm Adjaye Associates, the design of the pavilion drew inspirations from architectural typologies that ground the artist’s practice, from England’s bottle kilns of Stoke-on-Trent and beehive kilns of the Western US, to Roman tempiettos and Kasabi Tombs in Kampala. Alongside featuring a series of new Rothko Chapel-inspired tar works by Gates, the space will also be the home for Serpentine’s live programmes throughout the summer and beyond.

 

…And Their Legacy Shall Live On

Billionaire, philanthropist and collector Fayez Sarofim, whose private collection includes works by highly sought-after artists, from Hopper and Homer, to Kooning and Warhol, passed away on 27 May in his Houston home. His recent philanthropic efforts included a US$75-million gift for the expansion of Museum of Fine Art, Houston.

French painter Claude Rutault, known for his practice of “de-finition/methods”, from which his works were realised by people other than himself, through a set of rules, caveats, and instructions, has died aged 80 on 28 May.

Samella Lewis, who shaped African American Art history through her writings, died at age 98 on 27 May. Through preserving aspects of the African American experience that were neglected by some of the biggest institutions in the US, Lewis’ works inspired numerous artists, curators, and historians.

British graphic designer Colin Forbes, the celebrated co-founder of Pentagram who helmed countless designs of logos, interior spaces, and book covers, passed away in Westfield, North Carolina, on 22 May. He was 94 years old.

 

 

 
Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply