Save The Date: Biennales, Quinquennials and Other Perennial Exhibitions of 2022

Dean Cross, PolyAustralis #26 (SIR LES PATERSON), 2016, archival inkjet print on cotton rag, 54.9 x 84.1 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Tracey Moffatt, The Visit, 2019, c-type print, 79 x 73 cm and 79 x 117 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
The Milk of Dreams, published by NYR Children’s Collection, May 2017. Image courtesy of NYR Children’s Collection.
Manifesta 14 Prishtina local team. © Manifesta 14 Prishtina / Qazim Gashi. Image courtesy of Manifesta 14 Prishtina.
Jitish Kallat, Syzygy, 3013, dental plaster on wooden bench, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.
Rachel Kneebone, Raft of the Medusa V, 2015, porcelain, corian and adhesive, 48 × 57 × 50 cm. © Rachel Kneebone. Image courtesy of the artist.
TOP
1117
43
0
 
5
Jan
5
Jan
CoBo Social Design and Architecture

From Australia to Germany, Italy, Thailand, Kosovo and elsewhere, it might seem perennial exhibitions are back (almost) in full force this art calendar year. 

TEXT: CoBo Editorial
IMAGES: Courtesy of various

 

Let’s face it, the past two years has been a musical chair shuffle for events, whether it is cancellations, postponements, ditching IRL formats, or more postponements—it was a full-time job just trying to keep abreast of all the changes. As the pandemic gradually shifts into an endemic, and despite the barrage of digital disruptions, the calendar of IRL perennial exhibitions is shaping up again. We in Hong Kong might still have a tough time travelling freely but that doesn’t stop us from marking our diaries for these major exhibitions to catch—just don’t blame us if we look at you with green-eye envy across the digital sphere.

 

Dean Cross, PolyAustralis #26 (SIR LES PATERSON), 2016, archival inkjet print on cotton rag, 54.9 x 84.1 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Tracey Moffatt, The Visit, 2019, c-type print, 79 x 73 cm and 79 x 117 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

 

2022 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Free/State
4 March — 5 June 2022
Adelaide, Australia

Starting the year Down South where the weather is still, presumably, uber-pleasant, the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art returns in 2022 under the theme title “Free/State”. Helmed by Sydney-based curator Sebastian Goldspink, the exhibition will showcase 25 Australian artists—including Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Darren Sylvester, Tracey Moffatt, Julie Rrap, and Dean Cross, among others—exploring ideas of transcending states, and embracing notions of freedom in expression, creation and collaboration. As Goldspink says, “Each of these artists is emblematic of the many divergent facets of contemporary Australian art. Diversity is embraced and celebrated in ‘Free/State’ and the exhibition is reflective of a nation still in the throes of grappling with its past and defining its future.”

 

23rd Biennale of Sydney: rīvus
12 March — 13 June 2022
Sydney, Australia

Under the artistic directorship of Colombian curator José Roca, the Biennale of Sydney returns for its 23rd edition across eight sites in the city. Titled “rīvus”—meaning ‘stream’ in Latin—the biennale has so far announced 59 participants hailing from six continents and 33 countries, with more to come. Working alongside Roca are local curators Paschal Daantos Berry, Anna Davis, Hannah Donnelly, and Talia Linz, making up The Curatorium. According to the curatorial statement, “‘rīvus’ invites several aqueous beings into a dialogue with artists, architects, designers and scientists and communities, entangling multiple voices and other modes of communication to ask unlikely questions.”

 

Whitney Biennial
April — August 2022
New York, United States

Postponed from 2021, the longest-running survey of American art returns this spring for its 80th iteration. While we know it will be co-curated by Adrienne Edwards and David Breslin—the museum’s curator of performance and the director of curatorial initiatives respectively—little else is yet known about what the 2022 edition will bring but we are bracing ourselves for this widely acclaimed biennale.

 

The Milk of Dreams, published by NYR Children’s Collection, May 2017. Image courtesy of NYR Children’s Collection.

 

59th La Biennale di Venezia: The Milk of Dreams
23 April — 27 November 2022
Venice, Italy

One of the most highly revered biennales on the calendar, also called the Olympics of the art world, the 59th edition of the Venice Biennale was originally slated to take place in 2021. Postponed a year, it looks to be well worth the wait as the line-up of artists representing their national pavilions rapidly coming to light. “The Milk of Dreams”—the central theme of the biennale—is drawn from Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington’s 1950s children’s book. “Carrington’s stories describe a world set free, brimming with possibilities,” says Alemani. “But [the book] is also the allegory of a century that imposed intolerable pressure on the individual, forcing Carrington into a life of exile.” Three other themes cited by Alemani for the main exhibition are “the representation of bodies and their metamorphoses; the relationship between individuals and technologies; [and] the connection between bodies and the Earth.”

 

12th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art
11 June — 18 September 2022
Berlin, Germany

At the helm of the 12th Berlin Biennale, appointed in March 2021, will be artist Kader Attia. The curatorial team working alongside Attia—Ana Teixeira Pinto, Đỗ Tường Linh, Marie Helene Pereira, Noam Segal, and Rasha Salti—was announced just last month. While its list of participating artists and curatorial theme are still to be shared, Attia teased in an earlier statement that his biennial would centre on the “core decolonial concept through the lenses of their diverse background and critical practices.”

 

 

documenta 15
18 June — 25 September 2022
Kassel, Germany

Second (or maybe even first) to the Venice Biennale is the much-anticipated documenta 15. The quinquiennial exhibition is making ground-breaking art history for its 15th edition with Indonesian art collective ruangrupa taking the helm as curators, marking the first time in its history that the exhibition is not led by a Western or European artistic director, while also celebrating the first time its artistic directors hail from Asia. Working with the concept of ‘lumbung’—for ‘communal rice barn’ in Indonesian—ruangrupa’s documenta seeks to emphasis solidarity, fair distribution and collectivity. With all eyes from this region on ruangrupa, its 54 participating artists and collectives, and what documenta 15 will bring, this is the absolute must-see event of 2022.

 

Manifesta 14 Prishtina local team. © Manifesta 14 Prishtina / Qazim Gashi. Image courtesy of Manifesta 14 Prishtina.

 

Manifesta 14 Prishtina
22 July — 30 October 2022
Prishtina, Kosovo

Curated by Berlin-based Australian curator Catherine Nichols, the 14th edition of Manifesta, the European Nomadic Biennial, will take place this July in land-locked Pristhina, Kosovo. A press statement shared the theme of Manifesta 14 “takes up the challenge of exploring and generating new practices and modes of collective storytelling” with the citizens of Kosovo and “their ambition to reclaim public space and to rewire the future of their capital as an open-minded metropolis” at its core. This has already begun to take form when in June 2021, it was announced that Turin-based design and innovation office Carlo Ratti Associati in association with MIT’s Senseable City Lab was appointed to map Prishtina’s public areas to create a renewed urban vision.

 

Busan Biennale
August 2022
Busan, South Korea

While its pre-event programme has already kick-started, little of the nitty-gritty details is yet announced, only that it will be led by Haeju Kim, Seoul-based curator and deputy director at Art Sonje Center. Nonetheless, if it’s anything like recent past editions, we can be sure it’s worth pencilling in.

 

Biennale d’art contemporain de Lyon: Manifesto of Fragility
September 2022 – January 2023
Lyon, France

Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the 16th edition of the Lyon Contemporary Art Biennale sees independent curators Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath take the reigns. Although the artist line-up is yet to be public, the biennale takes the title “Manifesto of Fragility” and, according to a statement, “positions fragility at the heart of a generative form of resistance that is emboldened by the past, responsive to the present, and primed for the future.” Believing that dialogue is vital, its event programme will begin to unfold several months ahead of its September opening, with details to be announced.

 

17th Istanbul Biennial
17 September — 20 November 2022
Istanbul, Turkey

Originally slated for 2021, it was announced last May, just months ahead of its September opening that the 17th iteration would be postponed a full calendar year due to the uncertainty of the global pandemic. Helmed by curator Ute Meta Bauer, artist Amar Kanwar, and scholar David Teh, the exhibition “seeks to learn from the birds’ flight, from the once teeming seas, from the earth’s low chemistry of renewal and nourishment” according to a statement when the curatorial team was first announced in December 2020. Further details of theme and participating artists remain to be announced.

 

Singapore Biennale
18 October 2022 — 19 March 2023
Singapore

The seventh edition of the Singapore Biennale will return this October, helmed by four co-artistic directors—Binna Choi, Nida Ghouse, June Yap, and Ala Younis—each bringing their distinctive practices and cultures together with the vision of curatorial and artistic collectivity. So far, what we know is that the co-artistic directors seek for this edition to be a “journey through unfamiliar terrains and beyond geography itself” while continuing to posit the region of Southeast Asia as the most immediate context. As said in a statement, “In an attempt to apprehend and grapple with questions pressing for humanity, the Biennale will conceive ways in which to relate to a public without relying on spectacle.”

 

Jitish Kallat, Syzygy, 3013, dental plaster on wooden bench, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.
Rachel Kneebone, Raft of the Medusa V, 2015, porcelain, corian and adhesive, 48 × 57 × 50 cm. © Rachel Kneebone. Image courtesy of the artist.

 

Bangkok Art Biennale: CHAOS : CALM
22 October 2022 — 23 February 2023
Bangkok, Thailand

Always a highlight of the vibrant art activities in the Thai capital, the 2022 Bangkok Art Biennale has an exemplary curatorial team comprised of artistic director Apinan Poshyananda, art consultant Nigel Hurst, curator Loredana Pazzini-Paracciani, director of Gallery VER Jirat Ratthawongjirakul, and founder of Mysterious Ordinary Chomwan Weeraworawit. Under the theme of “CHAOS : CALM”, the exhibition strives to “reflect the unpredictable conditions that the world has endured over the past few years, from the COVID-19 pandemic to climate change and socio-political unrest.” The first round of artists participating already has us bookmarking this event, with names such as Jitish Kallat, Kimsooja, Rachel Kneebone, Marina Abramović, Arin Rungjang, and Chiharu Shiota, among others.

 

5th Kochi-Muziris Biennale: In Our Veins Flow Ink and Fire
12 December 2022 – 10 April 2023
Kochi, India

After being set back twice, it looks like the fifth edition of Kochi-Muziris Biennale may at last take place (fingers crossed with still 12 months on the calendar). Originally slated for December 2020, the Biennale will be curated by Singaporean artist and writer Shubigi Rao under the theme “In Our Veins Flow Ink and Fire” and will seek to embrace “the joy of experiencing practices of divergent sensibilities, under conditions both joyful and grim…It is in the robustness of humour that we can imagine the possibility of sustained kinship, and remember that we are not isolated in this fight”. A first list of participating artists was released back in July 2020 and included such names as Cecilia Vicuña, Richard Bell, Slavs and Tatars, Thao Nguyen Phan, Yinka Shonibare and Melati Suryodarmo.

 

You might also enjoy reading

 

 

 
Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply