Asia Week New York 2020—What to See, Where to Go

Koichiro Isezaki, Ridge Jar, 2019. Image courtesy of Ippodo Gallery and the artist.
Tung Ming-Chin, The Birth of a New Hero II, 2008, wood. Image courtesy of the artist.
Boro Aomori made in 2018. Image courtesy of Kyoichi Tsuzuki and Japan Society.
Sake Bottle from Gifu Prefecture in Japan, Momoyama period, late 16th century, stoneware painted with iron-oxide slip with an overlay of copper-green glaze under transparent glaze (Mino ware, Oribe type). Photography by Synthescape. Image courtesy of Asia Society, New York: Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection.
Seongmin Ahn, Aphrodisiac 27, 2019, ink, wash and pigment on mulberry paper. Photo courtesy of Korean Cultural Center New York.
Kimura Yoshiro, Vessel with Blue Glaze, 2013. Image courtesy of The Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Xu Bing, Square Word Calligraphy: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman, 2018, ink on paper, 227 x 124 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
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CoBo Social Market News Reports

The 11th edition of Asia Week New York returns from 12–19 March 2020. This year, 37 international galleries specializing in Asian art, alongside 16 museums and institutions will present a dazzling array of exhibitions, lectures and special events across eight days.

TEXT: CoBo Editorial
IMAGES: Courtesy of various

Further to the jam-packed calendar, a number of Asian art sales will be led by six auction houses, among them Christie’s and Sotheby’s. While most auctions have been postponed until June due to the outbreak of COVID-19, Christie’s will continue with its South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art sale on 18 March, while Sotheby’s Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art also remains unchanged for 16 March.

To help you decide what to see and where to go, here are CoBo Social’s top picks of the week.

 

Koichiro Isezaki, Ridge Jar, 2019. Image courtesy of Ippodo Gallery and the artist.

 

The Breath of Clay, The Life of Koichiro Isezaki’s Contemporary Bizen
Ippodo Gallery

12 March–16 April 2020

At Ippodo Gallery New York, Koichiro Isezaki’s vessels, tea bowls, and his latest ‘Yō’ (Conception) series will be showcased. Appearing to sink into itself, this beautiful collapse-form ceramic vase, graced by delicate flashing, is reminiscent of the flame traveling upwards, leaving soft hues of orange and brown, depicting a conversation about tradition and a challenge against history.

 

Tung Ming-Chin, The Birth of a New Hero II, 2008, wood. Image courtesy of the artist.

 

Forgotten Faces: Visual Representation of Trauma and Mass Killings in Asia
The Charles B. Wang Center, Stony Brook University

12 March–14 June 2020

Tracing the phenomena of major mass killings and political incidents in Asia where many died as a result of colonialism, Cold War politics, unstable nation-state systems, capitalism, globalization, social and economic inequality and growing ecological challenges, “Forgotten Faces” seeks to review the connection between these crimes against humanity and works of art. Several countries who have endured tough decades of civil unrest are investigated—from Cambodia, India and South Korea to Japan and Taiwan—illustrating the tensions between journalism and aesthetics, documentation of unspeakable acts and a crisis of representation.

 

Boro Aomori made in 2018. Image courtesy of Kyoichi Tsuzuki and Japan Society.

 

Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics
Japan Society

6 March–14 June 2020

“Boro Textiles: Sustainable Aesthetics” traces traditional Japanese textiles alongside contemporary works by three influential creators: Susan Cianciolo, Christina Kim and Junya for the famous fashion brand Comme des Garçons. The installation rediscovers the traditional handcraft, its history of survival and ingenuity, and its far-reaching influence in terms of today’s creative practices.

 

Sake Bottle from Gifu Prefecture in Japan, Momoyama period, late 16th century, stoneware painted with iron-oxide slip with an overlay of copper-green glaze under transparent glaze (Mino ware, Oribe type). Photography by Synthescape. Image courtesy of Asia Society, New York: Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection.

 

The Art of Impermanence: Japanese Works from the John C. Weber Collection and Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection
Asia Society New York

Through 26 April 2020

Drawing from two of America’s greatest private Japanese art collections, “The Art of Impermanence” showcases masterpieces of calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, lacquers, and textiles spanning from the Jōmon period through to the 20th century. From images that depict the cycle of the four seasons and red Negoro lacquer worn so it reveals the black lacquer beneath, to the gentle sadness evoked in the words of wistfully written poems, the exhibition demonstrates that much of Japan’s greatest art alludes directly or indirectly to the transient nature of life.

 

Seongmin Ahn, Aphrodisiac 27, 2019, ink, wash and pigment on mulberry paper. Photo courtesy of Korean Cultural Center New York.

 

MINHWA & minhwa: Korean Folk Paintings in Dialogue with the Contemporary
Korean Cultural Center New York

11 March–24 April 2020

Striving to forge a deeper understanding of Korean culture and heritage, the Korean Cultural Center New York is presenting a special showcase of minhwa, a form of traditional Korean folk painting dating back to the Joseon Dynasty (1390–1910). The exhibition seeks to explore how the minhwa tradition is being reinterpreted in contemporary Korean art through juxtaposing works by Seongmin Ahn with traditional pieces including Chaekgado screens and Morando paintings and more.

 

Kimura Yoshiro, Vessel with Blue Glaze, 2013. Image courtesy of The Philadelphia Museum of Art.

 

Kōgei: Art Craft Japan
The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Through Fall 2020

Japanese craftsmanship is a way of life for artisans who faithfully continue making their traditional crafts while devoting themselves to enhancing their skills, symbolizing a major hallmark of Japanese design. This installation celebrates Japanese kōgei, one-of-a-kind handcrafted objects made with traditional techniques and natural materials. The works on display highlight the specialized skills of contemporary kōgei artists specializing in clay, glass, and fabric making.

 

Xu Bing, Square Word Calligraphy: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman, 2018, ink on paper, 227 x 124 cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

 

One: Xu Bing
Brooklyn Museum

Through 26 April 2020

Central to this solo presentation of Xu Bing, one of the world’s most prolific living Chinese artists, is a newly commissioned work created and gifted to the permanent collection of Brooklyn Museum. Created in consultation with curator Susan L. Beningson, Square Word Calligraphy: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman (2018), celebrates the artist’s close relationship with Brooklyn, where he lived in the 1990s and maintains a studio today. Square Word Calligraphy: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman pays homage to Walt Whitman and is on display in 2019 in honor of the poet’s 200th birthday.

 

 

 
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