How New World Development’s ATRIUM HOUSE Blends Smart Home Living with Chinese Architectural Heritage

Clubhouse interiors featuring artworks by Andrew Luk. Photo by Harlim Djauhar Winata. Image courtesy of via..
The main entrance of ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Harlim Djauhar Winata. Image courtesy of via..
A corner of the “Tea Room” at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kenneth Chao. Image courtesy of via..
The banquet dining pavilion of ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kenneth Chao. Image courtesy of via..
The exterior of one of the pavilions at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kris Provoost. Image courtesy of via..
The alfresco “Tea Room” and pool area at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kris Provoost. Image courtesy of via..
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Asia Society Hong Kong

ATRIUM HOUSE, the latest residential property under New World Development’s Greatness Collection, is a celebration of heritage and traditions. As a homage to the rich historical value and distinctive vernacular architecture of its location, the design references the traditional Chinese siheyuan, with thoughtful upgrades for the contemporary lifestyle.

TEXT: Kate Lok
IMAGES: Courtesy of New World Development

Nestled in the leafy suburb of Shap Pat Heung in Yuen Long, Hong Kong, New World Development’s residential project, ATRIUM HOUSE (瑧頤), is the latest addition to the Group’s Greatness Collection, initiated by the Chief Executive Officer Adrian Cheng under the Group’s Artisanal Movement.

The development is situated near Lung Tin Village (龍田村), one of the many historic walled villages that the area of Yuen Long is known for, with many of them dating back to pre-war days. Against such historically significant and culturally-rich surroundings, the design of ATRIUM HOUSE cleverly combines vernacular architectural aesthetic with contemporary sensibility.

The remote location already reassures each of these 313-unit delivers quiet respite from the hustle of the city. The entrance features an imposing seven-metre-tall double metal door, flanked on either side by handcrafted blue brick walls, each brick carefully layered and set diagonally to create a peculiar rippling effect. Blue bricks—commonly found in the area’s walled villages—have had a long history of being used in Chinese residential architecture for its ability to maintain humidity levels, and the design team, helmed by architecture and interior design studio via., worked with local craftsmen to recreate this authentic architectural language throughout the property, with an added contemporary twist to better suit the modern day living.

 

The main entrance of ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Harlim Djauhar Winata. Image courtesy of via..
A corner of the “Tea Room” at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kenneth Chao. Image courtesy of via..
The banquet dining pavilion of ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kenneth Chao. Image courtesy of via..

 

Inside, a series of brick-clad pavilions form the residential clubhouse of the property, each fully equipped for different functions or activities. The public areas resemble old Chinese villages with its grey bricks and narrow alleyways. The interiors of these pavilions are defined by a softer palette, featuring cast concrete panels created with bamboo formwork to reflect natural sunlight during different times of the day.

ATRIUM HOUSE is very much inspired by, and built around the typology of a siheyuan—a type of traditional Chinese courtyard house that features a rectangular enclosed living space with strong emphasis on symmetry. In this contemporary reinterpretation, the central courtyard is replaced by an 18-metre swimming pool, and an alfresco “Tea Room” that overlooks magnificent mountain views of the Pat Sin Leng ridges.

 

The exterior of one of the pavilions at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kris Provoost. Image courtesy of via..
The alfresco “Tea Room” and pool area at ATRIUM HOUSE. Photo by Kris Provoost. Image courtesy of via..

 

To complement the Chinese aesthetic of the property, Hong Kong artist Andrew Luk was commissioned to create two artworks for the site, which sits in one of the clubhouse’s pavilions. Both are titled Bounded Omnipercipience, and belong to his “Horizon Scan” series, in which Luk takes a whole new approach to traditional Chinese landscape paintings using epoxy resin, polystyrene, and canvas on board with edge-lit LED lights. The shape of these works are also reminiscent of a traditional Chinese siheyuan, with the centre acting as a harmonious amalgamation of energy, people, and ideas.

The harmonious setting transitions seamlessly into the apartments of ATRIUM HOUSE, where earth tones are chosen as the main palette, with the inclusion of a series of patented home devices developed by New World Development—from MIRROR®, a mixed-use mirror complex equip with a USB hub to ArtisLock® which allows residents to use their fingerprint or the Artisanal Living Mobile App to open and close the front door, mailbox and elevator, among others—enabling a smarter home life through people-orientated design.

 

 

 

 
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