Where To Go For Art This Week: Hong Kong Galleries and Museums Reopening after COVID-19 Closures

He Duoling, Nymph No. 1, 2018, oil on canvas, 100 x 200 cm. Image courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.
Installation view of “Encounter: Part 2”, 13 May – 30 June 2020. Image courtesy of White Cube.
Larry Bell, Untitled, 1981, glass, 101.6 x 50.8 x 43.2 cm. © Larry Bell. Image courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
Michael Wolf, Industrial #26, 2015. © The Estate of Michael Wolf. Image courtesy of Flowers Gallery.
Liu Chuang, Bitcoin Mining and Field Recordings of Ethnic Minorities, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist and Antenna Space.
Isaac Chong Wai, Falling Carefully, 2020. Image courtesy of Asia Society.
Installation view of “A Sense of Place: from Turner to Hockney” at The Hong Kong Museum of Art, 30 November 2019 – 27 May 2020. Image courtesy of the Hong Kong Museum of Art.
Daphné Mandel, Organic City #1, 2019, mixed media on paper (acrylic painting, crayon, photo collage), 60 x 120 cm.Image courtesy of Pékin Fine Arts .
Installation view of “Günther Förg: 1986–1992” at Edouard Malingue Gallery, 8 – 23 May 2020. Image courtesy of Edouard Malingue Gallery.
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K11 HONG HONG'S SILICON VALLEY OF CULTURE

Since the beginning of the year, COVID-19 has raged across the globe. Social distancing orders, lockdowns, and other measures have been taken to prevent the spread, with galleries and museums shuttering their doors in response. Art Basel Hong Kong, Art Central, and other significant art events in Hong Kong were cancelled. However, as the city begins to recover, its art institutions are slowly but surely reopening their doors. Here are 12 exhibitions to see.

TEXT: Leanne Mirandilla
IMAGES: Courtesy of various

 

He Duoling, Nymph No. 1, 2018, oil on canvas, 100 x 200 cm. Image courtesy of Tang Contemporary Art.

 

He Duoling: Thunder Afar
Tang Contemporary Art
28 May – 30 June 2020

Perhaps originating from the bustling city of Chengdu is the reason behind Chinese painter He Duoling’s preoccupation with tranquil pastoral scenes. One of the best-known contemporary artists from the southern and western regions of China, along with peers Luo Zhongli and Zhang Xiaogang, He is recognised for his lyrical realism and poetic figurative paintings. This solo exhibition features the three series “Wild Garden, Nymph,” and “Various Flowers,” as well as other pieces created since 2010, most of which are studies of women and nature in He’s signature romantic, ethereal style.

 

Installation view of “Encounter: Part 2”, 13 May – 30 June 2020. Image courtesy of White Cube.

 

Encounter: Part 2
White Cube Hong Kong
13 May – 30 June 2020

The second phase of a two-part series dedicated to White Cube’s represented artists, “Encounter: Part 2” features paintings, sculptures, installations, and works on paper by over 15 prominent international names. With the aim of encouraging viewers to appreciate contrasts and similarities between various artists’ perspectives, the gallery has grouped the participating artists in different gallery spaces according to theme. Discover how Antony Gormley and Anselm Kiefer, for instance, address what it means to be human, or how Tracey Emin and Georg Baselitz have influenced the development of post-modern figure painting.

 

Larry Bell, Untitled, 1981, glass, 101.6 x 50.8 x 43.2 cm. © Larry Bell. Image courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

 

Selected Works; Special Characters
Hauser & Wirth Hong Kong
8 May – 30 May 2020; 16 June – 30 September 2020

Hauser & Wirth’s Hong Kong location reopens with two new exhibitions: group show “Selected Works,” followed by “Special Characters,” African-American artist Lorna Simpson’s first solo exhibition in Greater China. “Selected Works” is by appointment only and features artists such as Rita Ackermann, Günther Förg, Louise Bourgeois, Larry Bell, and Takesada Matsutani among others. “Special Characters,” on the other hand, comprises the latest works from Simpson’s series of the same name, as well as photographic collages and new paintings. Expect the artist to continue her interrogations into identity and history.

 

Georg Baselitz: Years Later
Gagosian Hong Kong
21 May – 8 August, 2020

Having grown up during World War II, German Neo-Expressionist artist Georg Baselitz has always been vigorous and critical in his works. This latest exhibition showcases 13 large oil paintings created with a contact printing technique, which involves using stencils to apply silhouettes to canvases with paint. This is the first solo exhibition by Baselitz to take place at Gagosian’s Hong Kong location; it is also the first exhibition to open at any of the gallery’s locations following the COVID-19 lockdowns.

 

Michael Wolf, Industrial #26, 2015. © The Estate of Michael Wolf. Image courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

 

Spotlight on Michael Wolf
Flowers Gallery
22 May – 25 July 2020

Undeterred by the global pandemic, Flowers Gallery opens its new Hong Kong space—its first location in Asia—this month, after celebrating its 50th anniversary. Founded by long time British gallerist and art collector Angela Flowers, the gallery’s inaugural exhibition is dedicated to the late German-born, Hong Kong-based photographer Michael Wolf. The exhibition spans an array of his works, including pieces from series “Architecture of Density,” “Informal Solutions,” and “Cheung Chau Sunrises.”

 

Liu Chuang, Bitcoin Mining and Field Recordings of Ethnic Minorities, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist and Antenna Space.

 

Garden of Six Seasons
Para Site
16 May – 30 August 2020

Originally scheduled to open two months ago, this group show was envisioned as a precursor to the Kathmandu Triennale. It is named for the Garden of Dreams, whose six pavilions were whittled down over time to three, in Kathmandu, where six seasons have been merged into four by climate change. Over 40 artists present works on the theme of change—with results both welcome and terrifying.

 

Lìxià
David Zwirner
From 5 May 2020

Closed since the end of January, David Zwirner’s Hong Kong space was the first of all the gallery’s international locations to reopen—for now, by appointment only. Visitors can look forward to perusing works by artists such as Suzan Frecon, Josh Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Luc Tuymans, and Lisa Yuskavage, among others.

 

Isaac Chong Wai, Falling Carefully, 2020. Image courtesy of Asia Society.

 

Next Act: Contemporary Art from Hong Kong
Asia Society Hong Kong
8 May – 27 September 2020

To celebrate Asia Society Hong Kong’s 30th anniversary, the centre takes the Confucian and popular contemporary significance of turning 30 as a starting point to look back at its work in the city and at the history of the city itself. Ten local artists were invited to create pieces informed by different research methodologies.

 

Installation view of “A Sense of Place: from Turner to Hockney” at The Hong Kong Museum of Art, 30 November 2019 – 27 May 2020. Image courtesy of the Hong Kong Museum of Art.

 

Various exhibitions
Hong Kong Museum of Art
From 6 May 2020

The Hong Kong Museum of Art has partially reopened with special hours. While the museum’s interactive exhibitions and public programmes remain suspended, seven of its exhibitions will reopen, including “A Sense of Place: From Turner to Hockney” and “Ordinary to Extraordinary: Stories of the Museum.” Additionally, admission will be limited and allocated across three two-hour sessions throughout the day, taking place from 10am to 12pm, 12:30pm to 2:30pm, and 3pm to 5pm. Visitors should pick up admission slips before each session.

 

Daphné Mandel, Organic City #1, 2019, mixed media on paper (acrylic painting, crayon, photo collage), 60 x 120 cm.Image courtesy of Pékin Fine Arts .

 

Daphné Mandel: Organic City
Pékin Fine Arts
16 May – 25 July 2020

The first exhibition to run this year at the Hong Kong branch of Pékin Fine Arts is a solo show by French-born artist Daphné Mandel, who showcases her latest artworks focused on her favourite subject: her adopted home Hong Kong. Her pieces combine the real and the surreal, juxtaposing easily recognisable urban scenes against imagined verdant backdrops.

 

Installation view of “Günther Förg: 1986–1992” at Edouard Malingue Gallery, 8 – 23 May 2020. Image courtesy of Edouard Malingue Gallery.

 

Günther Förg: 1986–1992
Edouard Malingue Gallery
8 – 23 May 2020

A key modernist artist since the 1970s, German painter, sculptor, and photographer Günther Förg’s innovative works evidence a mastery of colour and form. The gallery presents a selection of works Förg created in the late 80s and early 90s, after his departure from his preoccupation with photography, prints, and architecture in favour of more abstract works.

 

They Do Not Understand Each Other
JC Contemporary, Tai Kwun
25 May – 13 September, 2020

After temporarily shuttering JC Contemporary and suspending all exhibitions and events, Tai Kwun re-opens with a group show presented in conjunction with The National Museum of Art, Osaka and Singapore Art Museum. Including 18 artists from across the globe and co-curated by Yuka Uematsu and June Yap, the exhibition features selections from the museums’ existing collections as well as new commissions, all addressing the themes of cultural exchange and understanding.

 

 

 
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